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11 facts about child care in Australia

 
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-04/fact-file-facts-about-childcare/6277362ABC Fact Check takes a look at some of the facts and figures about child care in Australia. The rate of child care use in Australia increased by 77 per cent between 1996 and 2011 and the proportion of children in formal care rose from 13.4 per cent to 23.7 per cent. Informal care is provided to 38.6 per cent of children under the age of 12 by family or friends. Following the scrapping of Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s signature paid parental leave scheme, the Federal Government is now expected to turn its attention to child care. A Productivity Commission report released in February identified both access and affordability as major issues. “The Australian Government currently spends almost $7 billion a year to support families to access quality and affordable child care. “It is important that these taxpayer resources are spent in the best way to enable families to stay in work, get back to work and give their children the best possible start in life,” Social Services Minister Scott Morrison said when releasing the report. Read more about child care…

Productivity Commission childcare plan could cost low earners $8,000 report

http://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2015/mar/19/productivity-commission-childcare-plan-could-cost-low-earners-8000-reportParents on income support payments could be as much as $8,000 a year worse off by proposed changes to childcare payments, new modelling has revealed. The final Productivity Commission report into childcare, released last month, recommended that a number of different subsidies be rolled into one overarching subsidy. The consolidated subsidy proposed by the Productivity Commission would cover a maximum of 85% of childcare costs. The JETCCFA subsidy covers between 93% and 96% of the overall cost of childcare for eligible parents. The consolidated subsidy proposed by the Productivity Commission would cover a maximum of 85% of childcare costs. Modelling done by Early Childhood Australia (ECA) shows that parents with a child between three and five years old who access 10 hours of long day care a day could be thousands of dollars out of pocket under the Productivity Commission report’s suggestions. See more…

Childcare subsidies too low at $74 per day, Scott Morrison says

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting/scott-morrison-has-admitted-that-the-controversial-74-childcare-subsidies-per-day-is-too-low/story-fnet08ui-1227266837149The federal government is busy developing its new childcare funding package. Mr Morrison, who is continuing to work on the federal governments new approach to childcare funding, has indicated the Productivity Commissions recommendation to cap taxpayer funded childcare subsidies at between $72 and $74, depending on the age of the child, could make childcare more expensive for cash-strapped working families. Scott Morrison has flagged that the benchmark price identified by the Productivity Commission could make life harder for working mums and dads trying to pay for childcare. Read more…